Dehydrated fruit? — 11 posts

Dehydrated fruit?

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by docbrown
14 Mar 06 13:41

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Is dehydrted Fruit healthy? I love dehydrated Pineapple and Mango, it tasts sweet like sugar, is it healthy, I used to get it from the flea market or sometimes the super market, is this ok to eat?..dehydrated fruit?

by LuckySmile
14 Mar 06 13:45

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In moderation it is fine. I will send you an email soon as I get a chance I've been out of town for a few days.

by Light
14 Mar 06 13:46

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A dehydrated fruit has all the fiber and vitamins as a regular fruit. It just tastes sweeter due to the fact that the sugar is still there but there is less water.

If you are trying to cut calories and diet keep in mind that fruit still contains sugars. Try to limit your intake.

...I've read it somewhere...

by docbrown
14 Mar 06 13:59

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LuckySmile wrote:In moderation it is fine. I will send you an email soon as I get a chance I've been out of town for a few days.
Thats ok, take your time I hope all is well.

by docbrown
14 Mar 06 23:31

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docbrown wrote:
LuckySmile wrote:In moderation it is fine. I will send you an email soon as I get a chance I've been out of town for a few days.
Thats ok, take your time I hope all is well.
Tonight after dinner I had 5 Oranges and 2 Apples, since these are minus Calories can this do anything to my diet?

by Light
15 Mar 06 07:08

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Were the apples and oranges dehydrated or normal?
You can eat normal fruits all you want. Is more recommended to eat them in the morning on an empty stomach. Anyway fruits are good for you regardless of the time period you eat them.

by docbrown
15 Mar 06 13:50

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Light wrote:Were the apples and oranges dehydrated or normal?
You can eat normal fruits all you want. Is more recommended to eat them in the morning on an empty stomach. Anyway fruits are good for you regardless of the time period you eat them.
They where regular fresh fruit. My dad bought me a bag of Dehydrated Pineapple, but I don't want to eat them yet, there not Fat ot Fat Calories in them, thats pretty cool. also It's 140 Calories for 1/4th cup of the bag, and the whole bag is container of 4 How would I measuer that I wonder?

by Guest
07 Apr 06 03:12

Guest
[quote="Light"]A dehydrated fruit has all the fiber and vitamins as a regular fruit. It just tastes sweeter due to the fact that the sugar is still there but there is less water.

That's not quite correct...

Do dried fruits contain more nutritional value than fresh fruits?

The answer is simple. When you dry fruits, you lose more than just water. We have to remember that the nutrient loss in each fruit is different, but let's use cranberries as an example. Below is a comparison of one cup of dried cranberries versus one cup of fresh cranberries. The nutrient content of dried cranberries may come as very much of a surprise to you. The difference is even greater than the numbers would indicate since it take much more than one cup of fresh berries to make one cup of dried.

Nutrient Fresh Cranberries Dried Cranberries
Calories 47 370
Fiber 4g 7g
Vitamin A 44 IU 0IU
Beta Carotene 28 mcg 0
Vitamin C 13mg 0.2mg
Magnesium 5g 6g
Potassium 67 mg 48mg
Phosphorus 9 mg 10mg
Fresh cranberries also contain trace amounts of other vitamins and minerals.

The commercial process of drying fruit in large quantities is very hard on nutrients. Desirable components like beta-carotene, vitamin C, and many other nutrients are largely lost in the drying process. Fiber always remains, but on a cup-per-cup basis, calories and sugar actually go up. A cup of cranberries has about 47 calories; a cup of dried cranberries has about 363! We're all making a mistake when we routinely replace fresh fruit with its commercially dried equivalent.

With home dehydrating, however, it's a different story. A home dehydrator does nothing more than blow warm air up through the fresh fruit, and it's not nearly as harsh on the nutrients. (Many people like to start with fresh organic apple slices as a test). The fruit is still "dried" and last much longer than fresh fruit, but it isn't dried in the same way as a commercial processor would do it. Even though home dehydration is not a bad way to go from an overall nutrient standpoint, we all still need to be careful from the sugar and calories standpoint. Sometimes we might end up eating a lot more dehydrated apple slices than the amount of apple we would have eaten if we had a fresh, organic, whole apple in our hand. The chewing here and whole experience of eating can be quite different.

by Guest
07 Apr 06 03:25

Guest
docbrown wrote:
Tonight after dinner I had 5 Oranges and 2 Apples, since these are minus Calories can this do anything to my diet?[/quote]


Where and When did apples and oranges 'lose' their calories? Or became a 'minus' for that matter? 5 oranges and 2 apples is roughly 700 calories .....

Reguardless of how healthy fresh fruits can be ...700 calories consumed ...is still 700 calories. The reason why(some)people put fruits, and especially veggies on a 'free' pass is bc u have to eat A LOT of veggies (or certain kinds) to get any significant amount of calories -- but they are still there.

by Guest
07 Apr 06 03:32

Guest
"It's 140 Calories for 1/4th cup of the bag, and the whole bag is container of 4 How would I measuer that I wonder?"

If a serving is 1/4 cup@140 calories and the bag has 4 servings, that means if u ate the whole bag it would be 140 x4 =560.

by Guest
07 Apr 06 03:53

Guest
Which fruits and vegetables contain the most pesticide residues?

There are certain foods that you should try to buy organic as much as possible. These foods are those fruits and vegetables whose conventionally grown ‘alternatives’ have been found to contain high levels of pesticide residues.
In the mid-1990s, the Environmental Working Group developed the "Dirty Dozen", a list of high-risk, pesticide containing foods. In October 2003, they updated this list. We suggest that if you must prioritize your purchasing of organic produce, you focus on avoiding those that are included in the "Dirty Dozen". To learn more about why organic foods are important to your health and the health of the environment, you can refer to our in-depth article on Organics.

The Dirty Dozen
Apples
Bell Peppers
Celery
Cherries
Grapes (imported)
Nectarines
Peaches
Pears
Potatoes
Red Raspberries
Spinach
Strawberries
whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=george&dbid=57

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